First Google, now Facebook The dream of the Internet drone is over

First Google, now Facebook The dream of the Internet drone is over

First Google, now Facebook The dream of the Internet drone is over

After also gives up the development of his Internet drone. The aircraft with the wingspan of a 737 were supposed to circling autonomously at great heights for months in order to ensure the network connection in remote areas. Now stated in a blog entry that companies from the aviation industry are now also active in this type of technology and that instead of developing in-house, they want to work with partners like.

Facebook had been developing the drone, named Aquila, since 2014. The first flight in July 2016 ended in a crash landing. The Facebook drone stayed in the air for a good one and a half hours at low altitude instead of the planned test duration of 30 minutes. During the approach, according to a report by American crash investigators, there was strong turbulence – and a wrong decision by the autopilot software led to a section of the wing several meters long breaking. Seconds later, the drone hit the ground at a speed of around 45 kilometers per hour.

The second flight around a year ago then went smoothly. At that time, founder and boss Mark Zuckerberg was still confident that Aquila would help bring more people into the company.

The mother had given up her competing project to use large drones for Internet supply much faster. The technical challenges are too great, it was said at the beginning of last year. Alphabet continues to pursue the goal of building Internet coverage from the air. The company’s “loon” balloons are better suited for this than the drones, the Internet company said at the time. They were used – in cooperation with mobile network providers – in Puerto Rico, among others, to repair network failures after Hurricane Maria. Google bought the drone developer Titan Aerospace for its drone project in 2014, which Facebook also wanted at the time.