Huge LED Screen How Samsung Wants to Reinvent Cinema

Huge LED Screen How Samsung Wants to Reinvent Cinema

Huge LED Screen How Samsung Wants to Reinvent Cinema

It is fitting that the Korean electronics company chose the elegant one in the southeast of the South Korean capital for its entry into the cinema market. After all, the consumer temple with its associated 555-meter high-rise is one of the hottest shopping destinations in the Far East right now. Because the electronics giant is pursuing both high and impressive goals in its ambitions, its market strategists and the Lotte retail group recently presented a cinema screen that is unique in the world.

One of its developers believe that it will fundamentally change the way that movie lovers around the world will experience movies in the future.

At the opening of the shopping center this late summer, the partners put the world’s first cinema screen into operation, which consists of almost 8.3 million tiny LED light points and therefore no longer requires any projection technology. Instead, it works like a gigantic, 10.2 by 5.4 meter flat monitor – and lights up itself. What sounds more like a technical finger exercise at first, actually has remarkable consequences for the film experience.

This is what the “giant TV” from Samsung looks like
Samsung LED screen in the cinema at Lotte mall in Seoul, South Korea Source: PR
Samsung LED screen in the cinema at Lotte mall in Seoul, South Korea Source: PR
Samsung LED screen in the cinema at Lotte mall in Seoul, South Korea Source: PR
Samsung LED screen in the cinema at Lotte mall in Seoul, South Korea Source: PR
Samsung LED screen in the cinema at Lotte mall in Seoul, South Korea Source: PR

Because the screen itself shines and does not just reflect light, it cannot only display five to ten times greater contrasts between the darkest and lightest areas of the image than previous projection techniques. For films with such a contrast spread, the abbreviation HDR has established itself in the industry, which stands for High Dynamic Range, a particularly large dynamic range. What’s more, the display is also able to show a significantly larger color space (i.e. color tones and shades) than conventional monitors or projection methods.

Another consequence of the luminosity: All image areas appear equally brightly illuminated from all angles. The previously often noticeable decrease in brightness towards the edges and especially in the corners – the so-called vignetting – is a thing of the past with the mega-LED screen of the Lotte cinema. And the image quality is the same from all seats.

“We are thus offering a previously unknown visual experience,” says Jason Kim, one of the technical specialists behind the development of the LED screen. And he is right about that, as demonstrated by a demo in the Lotte cinema. To do this, the technicians have automatically adjusted the brightness values ​​of some scenes from Tim Burton’s film “” to the light intensity of their display using a contrast algorithm.

Spatial image effect without glasses

The result is just as astonishing as it is fascinating: glaring sunlight is displayed much brighter, the colors brighter and even in the dark parts of the picture details suddenly become visible that would not be visible under normal contrast conditions. What still looks like an artificial flood of colors on the posters advertising the new high-tech screen in the shopping center suddenly appears realistic in a previously unseen way when the images are played as a film.

Side effect of the contrast strength: the details appear so razor-sharp that the images, although only played in two dimensions, even convey a kind of spatial visual sensation.

The screen in Seoul does not only mean a leap in quality in film reproduction. It is also an expression of a reversal of the innovation dynamic between the TV and film world. While in the past the cinema was always considered to be the measure of all things thanks to the opulence of the images, the colors and of course the size, the youngest generation of flat-screen giants for the home had recently overtaken the classic screen for the first time.

Because HDR, the technology that also makes the pictures in Seoul look radiant, rich in detail and lifelike, has been available on the top televisions of the major device manufacturers since last year.

Streaming services such as or Prime are already offering the first films in a correspondingly higher color and contrast resolution. So far only for at home. The cinema could not keep up with the lack of suitable playback technology. The super display in Seoul is now changing that.