Return system There are cash for old batteries

Return system There are cash for old batteries

Return system There are cash for old batteries

The on-board electronics of vehicles are becoming more and more complex. Many car owners therefore have the battery changed by professionals. In many cases, drivers can also carry out this service, which is due every few years, on their own, but where should the old starter battery go?
Of course, never in the household garbage. Even more reprehensible: To dispose of the old batteries in the forest at the rest area or in bodies of water. In such cases, there is a risk of severe fines. And rightly so: because a battery contains, among other things, heavy metals and acids that must not be allowed to escape into the wild under any circumstances.
To ensure that car batteries are not carelessly disposed of and pollute the environment, there has been a take-back system for many years, which is regulated by the so-called Battery Act. Accordingly, everyone who sells new batteries has to accept old batteries. The law requires that distributors of vehicle batteries are allowed to charge an additional deposit fee of 7.50 euros when selling a battery, provided that the buyer does not hand in an old battery when purchasing it, i.e. swap it for a new one. If the customer does not do this, the seller will hand over proof of the deposit payment.
With this and the old battery, the consumer can then have his 7.50 euro deposit refunded at the dealer when the old battery is handed over. If he does not have proof of the deposit fee, the distributor must accept used batteries, but not pay the deposit fee. However, the end user can then have the delivery receipted, which allows him, for example, to have the deposit reimbursed by an online retailer, for example, on presentation of the receipt. This regulation is intended to prevent car owners from sending old batteries back by post, which is associated with certain dangers for the environment. In addition, drivers can also hand in their old batteries at recycling centers, which also do not pay a deposit, but can confirm acceptance.
Old batteries should always be moved with a certain amount of caution and as upright as possible. The batteries are usually not completely leak-proof: If they are lying on their side, acid can escape. In addition to chemical burns, dangerous gases can also be generated. If you want to be on the safe side, you should therefore wear gloves when carrying the old battery.